Coming Soon. Updated 5-8-2020

Native American name for fish? Native camp on the north side

The William Everett Tavern was located at what is known as Jocelyns Point, and later Leighton’s Point, which was a large 3 story house built about 1640. He was licensed to keep a tavern in 1649, and at that time there were 3 other Inns or Taverns, Mavericks, Emerys, and Jenkins. It was here at Everetts Tavern, that he courts of General Assembly and other town meetings were held. On November 16th 1652 residents of Kittery were effectively bullied into signing a submission to the Machassuets Bay Authoriy, to which was later contested by Gorges. While there is a plaque commemorating the historic event, it is believed the original location of the site may have been washed away by the Piscataqua. (3)

In 1638 (or 1635 as I’ve also read) Alexander Shapleigh, an agent of Ferdinando Gorges, sailed up the Piscataqua on his ship “Benediction” and landed in present day Eliot. He built the “Kittry House” which name was transfered from their manor in England. His faily hails from the Dart River, Kittery Point, Kingware Devonshire. In Eliot, their manor house, complete with kitchen, brewhouse, barn, and outbuildings, cellar, garrett, a total of two stories and 10 rooms. Before Kittery was a town, which was incorporated in 1647, most of the population lived in this area. (3)

Shapleigh’s interests were in the trading posts of Maine and New Hampshire, where he found a market for his goods sent over in his ships. His large interests in New England were looked after by the Treworgys and his son Nicholas, whose transactions in his name, with the depositions of servants, would make it appear that he was here at times when actually he was in England. [8]

Alexander spent most of his time in England and his family here managed his estates. On 2 Apr. 1641 James Treworgy sold all of Alexander’s property in America to Mr. Nicholas Shapleigh, then of Kingsweare, son of Alexander Shapleigh for £1,500. The ordinary, warehouse and a small parcel of land was left in possession of Capt. William Everett who died soon afterwards. In 1652 67 acres of land was confirmed by the town to Nathan Lord, son-in-law to Capt. Everett. Another 20 acres were confirmed to the heirs of Nicholas Frost. Another 47 acres were granted to others due to overlapping boundaries to other grant holders leaving Maj. Nicholas Shapleigh with about 760 acres of land.

From an article in the “Boston Globe” it seems as though the first cup of tea made in this country was made at Kittery House.[11]

The William Everett Tavern was located at what is known as Jocelyns Point, and later Leighton’s Point, which was a large 3 story house built about 1640. He was licensed to keep a tavern in 1649, and at that time there were 3 other Inns or Taverns, Mavericks, Emerys, and Jenkins. It was here at Everetts Tavern, that he courts of General Assembly and other town meetings were held. On November 16th 1652 residents of Kittery were effectively bullied into signing a submission to the Machassuets Bay Authoriy, to which was later contested by Gorges. While there is a plaque commemorating the historic event, it is believed the original location of the site may have been washed away by the Piscataqua. (3)

Just north, were Sandy Hill Farm is, was part of the Shapleigh family and River Road used to be called Sandy Hill. John Shapleigh and son Nicholas was attacked by natives along spruce creek, near the Kittery Trading Post. Nicholas was killed and John was taken prisoner and ransomed.

“F” Represents Watt’s Fort, which was still attached to the land. The large house may be Hammond Garrison?
The Road between 1 and 2 is Varney Lane in Eliot.
The Road along 4-5-6 is River Road Eliot.
1- W. M. Everett 1640, WM Leighton 1656
2- Abraham Conley, Thomas Jones
3- Reynold Jenkins
4-Nicholas Frost
5- JNO. Leighton 1690
6- Church